About your Search

20120928
20121006
STATION
CNN 29
CNNW 28
FOXNEWS 18
WHUT (Howard University Television) 12
KQED (PBS) 9
KRCB (PBS) 8
WETA 8
KNTV (NBC) 6
MSNBC 6
MSNBCW 6
COM 5
CSPAN 4
FBC 4
WBAL (NBC) 4
CSPAN2 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 187
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 187 (some duplicates have been removed)
or an educator but i think if these kids are hungry i guess my solution would be, eat your mother [bleep] lunch! (laughter) you know whose's not hungry in your old pal remmy counting out in the dumpster. because you gave him your lunch. so the usda which has been setting guidelines for subsidized school lunch force the past, oh, i don't know, 70 years, has, i'm trying to curb what everybody agree says childhood obesity problem changed the last year's school lunch men fru cheese pizza, canned pie nap app-- ian apple, tater tots into whole wheat cheez pizzar, applesauce and low fat milk. oooh. why is this news? >> new guidelines thanks to michelle obama, michelle obama school lunch calorie limits. >> michelle obama nutritional school lunches. >> jon: oh, man, oh, right, that's right. because this isn't really about food or kids. it's about big government uber thanny michelle obama who if she said we feed clean air half the country would demand gills because freedom! listen the complaint. >> the usda shouldn't be deciding how many calories we take or how many calories we expend during the day. at
a home or not, whether they have children or not, everybody pays for education, and every year they get worse education and it costs more. we've dumbed down our school program to rush kids through the system. why not do it the other way? why not had let the achieving kids rush through the system and get away from this burgeoning ed accuracy? beyond that, we're spending money on things that aren't being productive for our economy. let these achieving students, send them the message that if you achieve you will be rewarded. the idea we're going to get any of this taxpayer money back is kind of a mirage. taxpayers never get any money back. it will move on to the next boondoggle. i think it's a good idea. >> half of property taxes go to schools to be fair. tracy, the kids issue, you can get them out of your house two years earlier. what do you make about that? >> you know what, the money issue to me is separate from the academic development issue. i don't think these kids should be rushed through school. i do think there's a reason they need these years to develop as people. when you do loo
as a politician is hoping to change the game of education, to make it possible for all kids regardless of background or race to get the kind of schooling that will enable them to live their lives beyond a dream. >> kevin johnson of sacramento, california believes the time is now to issue a wakeup call to address the state of education among youth in america. johnson says the real facts are alarming. schools are failing children, which is why it's launched a program called stand up for great schools. it's an evaluational initiative, a fight for kids to achieve a solid foundation in school. >> i thought education was supposed to be my future. >> he believes you can't have a great city without great schools. >> the time is now. we're losing our children. if we as a faith community don't lead the way, then who do we think is going to lead the way. >> kelly: jonathan helped to organize the faith leaders policy summit recently held in atlanta, georgia. he's urging faith leaders and even civil rights leaders in the african-american community to mobilize their churches to help kids, parents, a
involved, because we're trying to get their money. >> it is a matter of public education, and that is where groups like dave's and other organizations that are trying to beat the drums to get americans to understand what is going on, is that what you feel is most important, educational? >> the first thing, in our country, if i had three wishes -- a strong, moral, ethical base. i had that growing up in the depression. a strong family unit in every home. now the divorce rate is over 50%, right? that is destabilizing. when i grew up in the depression of all times, we had the finest public schools in the world and the one thing a democracy must have is a well- educated population. our public schools are at the bottom of the industrialized world. that is the country. the great state of texas, where i went to schools and had an incredible education, is either 47 or 40 night in the 50 states. that is all our responsibility and we can correct that, but with these problems we face now, that is so fundamental about what we must do now, and we cannot pass that off to a house or senate or the state or
.n. symposium on education. she's been working hard to improve myanmar's ties with the outside world. observers say thein sein is stressing his alliance with the opposition leader to convince western nations to eliminate sanctions against myanmar. >>> torrential rain continues to wreak havoc across pakistan. at least 370 people have been killed and almost 1,200 injured during this year's monsoon. the national disaster management authority says southern sindh province is hardest-hit. 188 people have been killed and more than 28,000 displaced in the area. heavy rain has also devastated the eastern province of panjub. 60 people there have died. army troops are working around the clock to aid flood victims. officials say the military has used over 150 helicopters to distribute food. in sind province. reuters reports the prime minister ashraf has pledged more than 1.5 million u.s. dollars of food, tents and other emergency supplies. >>> singapore's economic success comes largely thanks to its hardworking citizens. female workers often have to choose between having a career or a family. and more and
, two the other they think he wants to do, he wanted to invest in education and training programs. that's all well and good, brenda and we know that's going to cost millions and millions of dollars, but that's not how the economy works. >> gary b, it's spending more, what does that do to the debt? >> well, brenda, he tries to get up, up, up. when i went to work for ibm 30-odd years ago, the government didn't teach me how computers work. bem caught me. rockefeller's oil company taught people how to drill for oil and gas and the third thing that strikes me that's not going to work. he wants to double manufacturing jobs, increase manufacturing jobs, that's fine, but why does the manufacturing get the benefit of government largest, why not the financial sector, oil and gas, all of this stuff drives the debt sky high and we know that the government can't spend money efficiently, it's just wrong. >> and jonas, there are also some tax hikes here, and wouldn't that do something to decrease the deficit? >> yes, it's the only specific tax increase that-- of both candidates and if you would close
jobs outdate faster and spin off new jobs. and they each one requires more education. and i just think if we're going it i think america is a huge advantage in the world. because the i think the world is going to be divided going forward between high imagination and enabling countries and low imagination enabling country. rethe highest imagination enabling country in the world. if you have spark of an idea you can go to delta in taiwan they'll design it. they'll get you a cheap chinese manufacture. amazon will gift wrap it for christmas. free lancer get the logo. they are commodities except this. that's no country that does better. the problem with this though, the days will ford will move to your job with 25,000 person factory is over. it's 2500 people and a lot of robots and you know the old joke, the modern factory of the future is two employees, a man and the dog. the man is there to feed the dog and the dog there to keep the man away from the machines. generating 12 million nor jobs maybe it's possible only going to be possible if we once again get everyone starting something. so
straight ahead. dan hurd: when i was a child, california was a leader in education funding. erika derry: and the fact that california isn't making it a priority frustrates me. dan hurd: i'm ashamed of that, and i don't want this to continue for my daughter. brenda kealing: prop 38 is going to bring a lot of money to our schools. suzan solomon: the money stays at the school site. cade derry: what i would really like to see is that the teachers... that were laid off come back to the school. navaz hurd: a smaller class size. navaz hurd: as a mom i want that. as a teacher i want that. prop 38 is an opportunity of a generation. quick thinking sacramento area schoolteacher who helped save the life of a choking student. >> after trying to swallow it, i was choking on it. >> he was in class and started choking on his breakfast burrito, his teacher saw him and performed the heimlich maneuver, something he learned ten years ago. >> i'm just glad it's over. ist all in a day's work. i'm glad i could help a student. >> i'm extremely thankful. >> his mom is thankful as well that the teacher said her
't be in this business of educating children and not be surprised and shocked when allegations of this nature come forward. >> the super inten dent says he's a highly regarded teacher who coaches basketball and volleyball, and is involved in the school's student leadership program. but not everyone we talked to is a fan. >> absolutely sick. >> this woman who didn't want to show her face on camera says her daughter complained to a counselor last year about what she felt was inappropriate behavior on the part of the teacher toward girls. >> she saw the way he acted with other students. he was way too flirty which made her uncomfortable. she didn't respond to that, so he didn't like her a lot. the other girls, he would text them, give them rides. he was way too friendly. >> her daughter's complaints were pushed under the rug. now, he faces criminal charges and parents are anxious by waiting to learn if the accusations are founded. >> now, is he out on bail tonight, the sheriff's department tells us he posted a $100,000 bail sometime between last night and this afternoon. again, that meeting in the me
, that as we've seen in our education nation series this week, american students are far behind their global competition in science and math. there is a push to reverse the trend and it starts by training future math and science teachers. our report from our education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> reporter: sherry lamb is studying science and learning how to teach it. >> chemistry and teaching is what i really, really enjoy. >> reporter: this college junior is part of "you teach" a program that helps the next generation be a group of math and science teachers. you have always been interested? they're offering free courses, and do field work at public schools as early as the next semester. after four years, they graduate with a bachelor's degree and teaching certificate. it is no coincidence that the focus is on math and science. >> years ago, if you had a strong back you could get a job. that doesn't exist anymore. >> reporter: the united states will need an estimated 230,000 math and science teachers by 2015 to be competitive in years ahead. >> if you ask where the jobs are, it is in scie
in the millions of chinese students eager for a foreign education. nhk world's michitaka yamaka reports. >> reporter: more than a thousand young people from around china gather at a hotel in beijing. they are students attending an open house. more than 40 of them. >> i want to enroll in a prestigious american university because the quality is high. >> eventually for undergraduate students, and this is one of the main goals is to recruit more undergraduate students. >> reporter: many chinese state of the unions are keen on setting up foreign universities, and if they can, make it overseas to study. overseas universities are coming to them. for example, the missouri state university, a u.s. institution, has a campus. >> at what temperature does water freeze? what would you tell me? >> reporter: chinese students of the famed degrees of the university students in the u.s. more than 2,000 chinese have graduated from here since classes started six years ago. li xinyi hopes to join them. she's a senior studying busiss administration and accounting. li comes from inland china. she achieved exce
together, civil society, i.e., ngos, ie, education, et cetera, bring them together with business, bring them together with government, both at the national or and at the sub national level and really collaborate intensely to come to a solution. >> rose: we continue this evening with matt damon and gary white, theyre cofounders of water.org. >> and i heard these statistics that were jaw dropping about a child dying every 20 seconds because of lack of access to clean water and sanitation, that is, that to me is just staggering, because -- because to relate to that as an american, i mean, we don't know people who are thirsty, it just doesn't happen, right? you know, with away don't know kid who die from diarrhea. >> rose: water is ubiquitous. >> yes, of course, or cholera for that matter, just clean water. so, you know, so that was one side of it, just the mindless death and bono talks about stupid death, you know, because it is preventable. >> we have known how to make water safe for more than 100 years, right? imagine we discovered the cure for aids today, and 100 years from now
dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >>> host of towards 80 in oakland it's not too bad there. good to 22 northbound 68 getting word that two plants are blocked approaching red deer road. traffic is beginning to slow. is a lot of the nimitz. a little bit of luck as you had passed out the old coliseum. he conceived a fall on our golden gate bridge camera. >>> the patchy fog thinned out towards the coastline if you're heading that direction. ocean beach very great to start the day off. the fault has slipped inside the day and some of the valleys as a way of a well. fifties' elsewhere outside by the afternoon were enjoying the beautiful sunshine low eighties to low 90s in line. pickled patches of fog toward the coast. ,,,,,,,, >>> pig farmers are predicting a global bacon shortage. yeah. however, they say the shortage can be ave
to do as well is educate people making a difference. we now have data on that specifically saying just how much of an impact does it make? take a look at this. spend a minute looking at the full screen. if people are provided exercise advice, look how the numbers change among the african-american. 54.7. lower than the white population. 57.8%. simply by getting some of the education on exercise, nutrition. you've asked about that in the past. we've talked about it. again, the number is lower. we know as well that that education makes a huge difference. >> i want to bring in as well a group of amazing women that i met. >> we're going to talk about this. >> this is my favorite segment. i met a group of enthusiastic women, and they are tackling the obesity problem. they are basically putting on their running shoes. they are putting it on the pavement. this is an organization that's called black girls run. we ran with them. >> reporter: whether you lead the pack or come in dead last, everyone is celebrated. >> it really is about friendship, sisterhood. we're not going to leave any woman beh
, by thinking about where you want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >>> welcome back, everybody. you're watching "starting point" exclusive this morning. the group that was started by new york city mayor michael bloomberg, mayors against illegal guns, is releasing a new tv ad today and they're hoping to make a statement ahead of this week's presidential debate. the debate is in denver, not far from the aurora movie theater. where 12 people were shot and killed and 58 others injured in july. the ad features a victim of the shooting, stephen barton. >> this past summer in a movie theater in colorado i was shot. shot in the face and neck. but i was lucky. in the next four
, jobs, the education for their kids, for businesses, and these are the issues we have to solve. their unemployment is higher thanks to my opponent than the general population. we have to put together jobs programs that work. every time my opponent says she voted for a jobs act, the unemployment has gone higher, higher in the state. that has to change. i can remember when she was saying, the stimulus will have 35,000 jobs in nevada. we were losing 65,000 jobs in nevada every time she talks about jobs growth, unemployment goes higher. >> thank you. our next question. >> one of the biggest issues we face on the federal law for is our overwhelming federal debt. has gone beyond just a domestic problem that will affect future generations. it has become a national security issue and a foreign- policy issue. what specific steps do you propose the united states take to get out of debt or at least make our interest payments easier to live with? >> we have to get our debt under control. and and wasteful spending. this is the way we do it. the first thing we do is stop giving tax breaks to
health care is the top social issue. 33% say it's education. but there's also guns, abortion, same-sex marriage. we all know that the economy is actually issue number one with most voters, but social issues still play a big part for voters in making their final decision. joining me now to talk about the potential impact of these issues, cnn contributor maria cardona and amy holmes, anchor of "real news on the blaze." good to see both of you. maria, what's number one in your book in terms of social issues? >> well, it's interesting, because while you mentioned health care, i think a lot of voters also see health care as an economic issue, because that's the number one concern when they look at health care is costs, and what that is going to mean for their family. so i think health care is a big issue. and in some respects, if it's looked at as a social issue, i think it actually helps the president because he's the one who was seen as putting health care out there and even though the health care act itself is not incredibly popular, pieces of it -- the fact that those pieces have ac
in the budget here. especially on education, but then you see the student protesters that are coming out. does he have a problem? people want more and more from him. >> yes. and for a man who -- i mean, i wouldn't say he went from hero to zero, but he was such a hero after the miners rescue, and now, of course, his ratings are languishing, although he can't stand for re-election in 18 months time. what happened, of course, is expectations. chile is just on the verge of reaching developed country status. it's a member of the oecd. it's got rising gdp per capita. all the economics, pieces of the jig saw are there. as you know, when people's expectations rise, when they're not fulfilled, that's when you get into trouble. >> it happens to the best. thank you, richtd. good to see you. >> we've all heard those jokes about cops, donut shops, but one police force actually taking the weight problem very seriously. either get fit or get fired. choe world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, thei
of every dollar spent on education in the state of illinois is spent for retirement and health care for teachers. 71 cents. megyn: that's incredible. >> this is a state that is corrupt, it is a state with officialdom that is utterly dysfunctional and incompetent, and you just saw one of the greatest nonsense acts, pure political theater in chicago, mayor rahm emanuel and the teachers' union coming to a deal which resulted in a 16.5% pay raise while only 15% of their students are proficient if reading, more than half are not even capable of basic reading skills. meg "the wall street journal" wrote sooner or later we knew it would come to this since the democrats can't bring themselves to oppose union demands. they give and they gave give and they give to the unions, and eventually the bill comes due. but the question is whether any federal politician would have the gall to put the taxpayers of the nation, the federal taxpayers on the hook for those deals struck in those rooms in chicago. >> well, obviously, there's one by the name of president barack obama who's doing precisely that,
that for decades used one-room schoolhouses to educate its kids. guglich says those days are long gone. >> within the last ten years, we had to start servicing not only the farming community but now the oil community. >> reporter: guglich expects his student body to double in size in the coming years as oil workers bring their families to williston and more affordable housing becomes available. today real estate prices here are on par with ples like new york city and san francisco. new residents are routinely paying more than $2,000 a month in rent. those prices were a problem for guglich, who needed to increase his staff dramatically this year in a state that ranks next to last in the country in teacher pay. >> we hired 14 new teachers and we were able to find housing for most of them, but we still have five teachers who don't have permanent housing. some are staying on couches, some are staying in homes that are in the process of being sold, so they are sleeping on air mattresses, kind of like squatting. >> reporter: one of those squatting teachers is melanie burroughs, who recently moved to wi
often use ce tkeep g from getting an education. there ne wom that braved all of that to set up a free schoolor girls nea she is this week's cnn hero. >>> in afghanistan most of the ve no voice. th used as property of a family. the piure is very grim.s the founder of a girls school in afghanistan. when we opened the school in 2008, 90% of em could not write the name. than ad00% of them are educate they can write. i lived in the u.s. for over8 9/11. but i was really affected i really wanted to prove that muslims are not terrorists. i came back he in 2002. have been the most oppressed, and i thoughtave to do mething. it was a struggle inthe beginning. uld si with these men, and i would tell them don't marry thhey're 14 years old. they want to rnea>> h do you wr father's name? after ve years t n, they're proud of their girls. when they theelvesan write >> very good. >> still, we have to takeis th and give girls options. so many people are so much against girls getting educated. we provide free education to over 350 girls. i think it is like a fire that will grow every year my hope become
's office politics. >> this is an interview that was 100% about education policy. so i really had to do my homework. if you are going to try to ask questions of somebody who has been dealing with, and administering education policy for basically the last four years, i tried to do a little bit of homework. so that was the hardest part, probably. the second hardest part is more logistical. when you interview the president, or a presidential candidate, they usually give you a very short amount of time. in this case, i think we had 15 minutes. and you'd be surprised, you may not, but most people would be surprised how quickly that goes. i mean, that's really just four or five questions, depending on how lengthy the answers are. now, i did go a little over the time limit. i ended up going 20 to 22 minutes. >> so how does he end it? does somebody come in and say we're done? >> it's a funny little behind-the-scenes thing. sometimes, i think it's just known that you'll go a little bit past the time limit. the white house understands that. we understand that. you can do it within reason. so when i
for government, he agreed with president obama on education to get those women voters on board. you know, it was a different calibration about a more centrist -- >> did you see a tack to the center? there were times romney was saying we'll keep the good things in obama care, get rid of the bad things. we'll keep the good things in bowles-simpson and get rid of the bad things. we'll keep the good things in the banking regulations but get rid of the onerous things. >> coming out of this debate, the conservatives have really been fired up. look at the "wall street journal" editorial page today which is sort of a signal of where things are going in conservative thinking. they're very positive and yet at the same time, i think with a lot of sublety, he made other people, say women, feel more comfortable with him, that it wasn't sort of extreme, that he had an understanding. i thought that was probably the most graceful thing they did in the debate. they made him aggressive and more comfortable at the same time. >> we will also talk to ralph reed about the reaction among conservatives, especia
. they don't. islamic extremists often use violence to keep girls from getting an education. there is one woman that braved all of that to set up a free school for girls near kabul. she is this week's cnn hero. >>> in afghanistan most of the girls have no voice. they are used as property of a family. the picture is very grim. my name is razia jan, and i am the founder of a girls school in afghanistan. when we opened the school in 2008, 90% of them could not write their name. today 100% of them are educated. they can read. they can write. i lived in the u.s. for over 38 years, but i was really affected by 9/11. i really wanted to prove that muslims are not terrorists. i came back here in 2002. girls have been the most oppressed, and i thought i have to do something. it was a struggle in the beginning. i would sit with these men, and i would tell them don't marry them when they're 14 years old. they want to learn. >> how do you write your father's name? after five years the men, they're proud of their girls. when they themselves can write their name. >> very good. >> still, we have to take
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 187 (some duplicates have been removed)